Thankgiving Day Food Tips
Nov 10
2018
Thankgiving Day Food Tips

Thanksgiving is a time for friends, family and holiday feasts—but also a time for possible distress for our animal companions. Pets won’t be so thankful if they munch on undercooked turkey or a pet-unfriendly floral arrangement, or if they stumble upon an unattended alcoholic drink.

Check out the following tips for a fulfilling Thanksgiving that your pets can enjoy, too:

  • Talkin’ Turkey: If you decide to feed your pet a small bite of turkey, make sure it’s boneless and well-cooked. Don't offer her raw or undercooked turkey, which may contain salmonella bacteria. Do not give your pet the left over carcass–the bones can be problematic for the digestive tract.
  • No Bread Dough: Don't spoil your pet’s holiday by giving him access to raw yeast bread dough. When a dog or cat ingests raw bread dough, the yeast continues to convert the sugars in the dough to carbon dioxide gas and alcohol. This can result in bloated drunken pets, which could become a life-threatening emergency, requiring hospitalization.
  • Don't Let Them Eat Cake: If you plan to bake Thanksgiving desserts, be sure your pets keep their noses out of the batter, especially if it includes raw eggs—they could contain salmonella bacteria that may lead to food poisoning.
  • A Feast Fit for a King:While your family enjoys a special meal, give your cat and dog a small feast of their own. Offer them made-for-pets chew bones. Or stuff their usual dinner—perhaps with a few added tidbits of turkey, vegetables (try sweet potato or green beans) and dribbles of gravy—inside a food puzzle toy. They’ll be happily occupied for awhile, working hard to extract their dinner from the toy.

A few small boneless pieces of cooked turkey, a taste of mashed potato or even a lick of pumpkin pie shouldn’t pose a problem. However, don't allow your pets to overindulge, as they could wind up with a case of stomach upset, diarrhea or even worse—an inflammatory condition of the pancreas known as pancreatitis. In fact, it’s best keep pets on their regular diets during the holidays. 

Article by ASPCA

 

Why You Should Let Your Dog Sniff During Walks
Oct 13
2018
Why You Should Let Your Dog Sniff During Walks

It’s important that your dog gets his daily walk for exercise purposes. But it’s just as vital to let your dog sniff his surroundings. For many dogs, a walk is the highlight of their day and they are content to go anywhere as long as they get to be outside and with you. While on a walk, some dogs have a tendency to stop and sniff what seems like every couple of seconds – this can make your walk longer than you intended and it is frustrating for some dog owners. But should you let your dog sniff during his walk? Though dogs have the same five senses that people do, their sense of smell is infinitely stronger. In fact, a dog’s sense of smell is the primary way he takes in information about the world around him. For a dog, sniffing things is an automatic behavior – this is how he experiences the world, the same way you experience the world through vision. That’s why it’s so important that you let your dog sniff things while he is out on a walk. You don’t necessarily have to indulge him every time, but you should remember that the walk is for his benefit. If your dog wants to sniff something for a few seconds, let him!  

Train Your Cat To Kiss
Sep 29
2018
Train Your Cat To Kiss

How to Train Your Cat to Give Kisses
  1. Place some cream cheese or baby food on your finger or cheek.
  2. Call your cat. Point you your face or finger and say "kiss."
  3. Praise your cat by petting him and giving him a cat treat. Eventually, your cat will discover that he actually enjoys kisses. 

 

How to Bond With a New Kitten
Sep 01
2018
How to Bond With a New Kitten

Congratulations – you just brought a new kitten home! Now the fun can really begin!

Of course there will be fun times, and lots of them, but first it’ll be important to bond with your new kitten so that you build up a trusting relationship to last for years to come. “Sharing your home with a kitten can be quiet different than living with an adult cat,” says Katie Watts, Senior Feline Behavior Counselor at the ASPCA Adoption Center. “All cats and kittens are individuals, but it’s important to consider if you’re ready for the higher activity level and mischief that most kittens are all about.”

For starters, your kitten will need a great deal of interactive playtime with appropriate cat toys – like dancers and feather wands – so be prepared to devote at least 15 minutes, three times a day to those activities. “They also like to explore and get into everything, so make sure to kitten proof well, securing any valuables or anything that could pose a hazard to the kitten if knocked over. If you work full-time or you’re away for most of the day, consider getting a pair of kittens so they have a playmate when you’re away.”

After you know you’ve prepared your home for a new kitten, it’s actually quite easy (and fun!) to go about bonding with him yourself. “Interactive playtime is a great way to form a bond with your new kitten,” says Watts. “Be sure to use appropriate toys like feather wands or cat dancers, and not hands. Most find these toys irresistible. If your kitten is a little nervous or unsure of people, hand-feeding them treats or a bit of their food is a great way to build trust.”

If your kitten is actually well socialized, then doting on him with a lot of cuddles and pats is a great way to build a bond. “Once they’re comfortable in their new home, invite a friend over to interact with your kitten as well,” suggests Watts. “Exposure to multiple people is a great way to ensure they grow up to become social adults.”

Keep in mind a couple of no nos when it comes to bonding with your kitten. “It’s cute when they’re young, but encouraging your kitten to play with hands or feet is a huge no no,” says Watts. “This shows them that biting and scratching is an appropriate form of play, and they will grow up with this as a habit. Once they have adult-sized teeth and claws, this can become dangerous, and can become a habit that’s hard to change.”

You’ll also need to pay attention to your kitten’s reactions, and learn to recognize when she is uncomfortable. “If she’s clearly uncomfortable, don’t force her into that situation,” says Watts. “Work on getting her used to certain things gradually. For instance, if your kitten is very scared of visitors, don’t have a party and force your kitten to be the center of attention. Gradually expose her to one person at first, and work up from there. Treats and toys are great for coaxing nervous kittens into new experiences, too.

Article by Cheryl Lock

 

Why Is My Dog Throwing Up Bile
Aug 27
2018
Why Is My Dog Throwing Up Bile

Dog vomiting is a somewhat common occurrence, but it becomes a true health concern when a dog is throwing upbile. If your dog throws up yellow foam, or a yellow-green foam, it’s probably bile, and you should take your pup to the vet right away to determine the cause. Bile is produced in the liver, stored in the gall bladder and released into the small intestine to help break food down. This helps the body digest and utilize the food properly. If your dog is throwing up bile, these are the five most common reasons.

Article by PetMD